A Form to Speak

New Hampshire’s Aidron Duckworth Museum Showcases Vermont Artists

Ten miles over the Connecticut River from White River Junction, in the town of Meriden, New Hampshire’s former elementary school, is a small museum dedicated to preserving the life and work of Aidron Duckworth, a painter and teacher who left his home-studio to a charitable trust tasked to “promote the appreciation, practice, and teaching of art in and around New Hampshire and surrounding communities.” The museum is closed for winter because heat from the sole woodstove reaches only the artist’s studio and living area.

Vermont Art Guide #7 has nearly two hundred places to see art around the state. The full-color, printed magazine has artist and venue profiles as well as articles and news about Vermont Art. Our goal is to document and share the state’s incredible art scene. SUBSCRIBE TODAY

“In many ways Aidron was a prototypical artist’s artist working through ideas with little regard to what was was popular or commercially viable in the art world of his era,” said Museum Director Ben Finer. “His art was an engagement with existential questions of humanity or the workings of the mind and he had little time for careerism or stylishness. Duckworth’s devotion to his practice can be felt in the sheer breadth of the work as well as the variety of forms he used. Some concepts he worked with for decades, taking an idea apart and putting it together in a new and different way but carrying a thread of the previous work as an undercurrent.” The Museum, with its collection of 1300 artworks, allows visitors to encounter the artist’s life through his work, writing, and library.

His art was an engagement with existential questions of humanity or the workings of the mind.

“As a teacher, Duckworth was adamant that a student find her own voice and path,” said Finer. “Rather than attempt to match Guest Artist’s work with the Duckworth collection, the Guest Artist Program is an attempt to exhibit artists who have found a voice and a form with which to speak.”

Vermont Art Guide #7 has nearly two hundred places to see art around the state. The full-color, printed magazine has artist and venue profiles as well as articles and news about Vermont Art. Our goal is to document and share the state’s incredible art scene. SUBSCRIBE TODAY

The Aidron Duckworth Art Museum, opened in 2002, is located at 21 Bean Road in Meriden, New Hampshire. In 2018, the museum is open from April 28 to October 28, Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 10AM to 5PM. Since 2008, the museum has invited guest artists “as way to add vitality to the museum offerings,” explained Finer. For more information, call (603) 469-3444, visit www.aidronduckworthmuseum.org or follow on Instagram @aidronduckworthmuseum.

EXHIBITIONS

June 9-July 22, organic lines and geometry conspire in Sheri Hancock-Tomek’s printmaking. On Saturday, June 9th, sculptor John McKenna will unveil Column II on the grounds, a notable aluminum, acrylic glass, and wood work that “contains more space than material.” McKenna will perform a work of music written specially to accompany the sculpture.

June 23-October 28, Sande French-Stockwell will install, “Parliament of the Souls”, ceramic sculptures on the grounds of the museum.

Later in the summer, Galen Cheney will exhibit abstract work, July 28-September 9, and this fall, Johnson painter Joseph Salerno will exhibit September 15-October 28.

Images (top to bottom):
untitled by Aidron Duckworth (14″x17″; acrylic and pastel on paper; 1986)
from the “Strata Series” by Sheri Hancock-Tomek