Bryan Memorial Gallery

Both Alden Bryan (1913–2001) and Mary Bryan (1906–1978) were painters who moved to Jeffersonville in 1939. Their legacy is this gallery, founded in 1984, which promotes the work of Vermont and New England artists.

Bryan Memorial Gallery
180 Main Street
Jeffersonville, Vermont 05464
(802) 644-5100

Hours:
Day after Columbus Day to December 24th: Thursday-Sunday, 11AM-4PM
Closed: December 25-February 1
February-March: Friday-Sunday, 11AM-4PM
Closed: April
May-June: Thursday-Sunday, 11AM-4PM
July 1-Columbus Day: Daily, 11AM-5PM
and always by appointment

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ART ON VIEW

Legacy 2018
January-December 2018

Both Alden Bryan (1913–2001) and Mary Bryan (1906–1978) were painters who moved to Jeffersonville in 1939. Their legacy is the Bryan Memorial Gallery gallery, founded in 1984, which promotes the work of Vermont and New England artists.

Through December 31, “Legacy 2018” is full of new works by the best selling artists of 2017! New artists in Legacy 2018 include Dianne Panarelli Miller, Ken Dewaard, Irina Rybakova, Dennis Sheehan, Tom Adkins, and SSam Vokey. They join returning favorites Eric Tobin, Andrew Orr, TM Nicholas, Julie Y Baker Albright, Jeanette Fournier, Bob Aiken, Susan Bull Riley, Tom Nicholas, Mark Tougias, Fiona Cooper Fenwick, Chris Magadini, Mary Martin, Jayne Shoup, and John Clarke Olson. All of the work in the “Legacy 2018” is for sale. The exhibition provides a unique opportunity to collect historic work as well as artwork by vetted and established artists at the top of their career.

(text adapted from the venue’s press materials)

image: Old Red Mill by Ken Dewaard


PREVIOUS EXHIBITIONS

nicholastm-lateafternoonsun

2016 Legacy Collection
January-December 2016

Both Alden Bryan (1913–2001) and Mary Bryan (1906–1978) were painters who moved to Jeffersonville in 1939. Their legacy is the Bryan Memorial Gallery gallery, founded in 1984, which promotes the work of Vermont and New England artists.

Through December 30, “2016 Legacy Collection” features thirty-eight artists whose works continue the legacy of Alden and Mary Bryan. Paintings in oils, watercolors, acrylics, photographs, pastels and mixed media are on view. The exhibition is organized in three parts: “Hidden Treasures” is a collection of works by deceased artists. A section is dedicated to providing a fresh look at works by founders and namesakes, Mary and Alden. And third section presents work by artists who were recognized with awards the previous year. These selections reflects the aesthetics and life work of the founders. This year the focus is on William B. Hoyt, Tom Nicholas, and T.M. Nicholas. All of the work in the “2016 Legacy Collection” is for sale. The exhibition provides a unique opportunity to collect historic work as well as artwork by vetted and established artists at the top of their career.

A spotlight about the Bryan Memorial Gallery appeared in the print edition of Vermont Art Guide #2. Purchase Vermont Art Guide #2 or subscribe to get news about Vermont art venues.

Image:
Last Bit of Sun
by T.M. Nicholas
11″x14″
oil on canvas


robert-douglas-hunter-still-life

Robert Hunter Douglas and His Students
June 30-September 5, 2016

Artists’ Roundtable: Sunday, July 3, 1PM

“Robert Douglas Hunter & His Students” presents 24 paintings by Robert Douglas Hunter, called “The Dean of the Boston School of Painting”, and 60 paintings by 20 of his students over 40 years.

Robert Douglas Hunter (1928 -2014) was a master of still life painting, and had he done nothing else throughout his 62-year career, he would have found his place in American art history by virtue of his still life paintings alone. Early in his life, however, he had the singular distinction of studying with two of the most influential art teachers in the East, Henry Hensche and R. H. Ives Gammell, who set him on course not only as a painter, but also as a teacher.

From his classroom at the Vesper George School of Art in Boston, Hunter taught and influenced his painting students over a 35-year period. When Vesper George closed, Hunter continued to teach and influence students in private lessons, workshops and anywhere he went to paint until his death in 2014.

Hunter was completely at home in the classroom and many of his students found themselves eager to follow his principles and the values of his life. Their loyalty to him and his ideas about painting has lasted throughout many of their lifetimes, as evidenced not only in their artwork, but also in their own teaching careers as they train the next generation of painters.

Participating artists include Hunter’s first student, Sidney Willis, and his last student, his daughter, Cate Hunter Kashem, and Bruce Bauman, Geoffrey Chalmers, T.A. Charron, Richard Copello, David P. Curtis, Neil Drevitson, Tom Dunlay, Robert Scott Jackson, Stapleton Kearns, Gayle Levee, David Lowrey, Dianne Panarelli Miller, John Murphy, Vail Pagliarani, Melody Phaneuf, Sergio Roffo, Dennis Sheehan, and Sam Vokey.

On Sunday, July 3 at 1PM, the Bryan Memorial Gallery’s Artists’ Roundtable features Hunter’s widow, art historian Elizabeth Ives Hunter, and their daughter Cate Hunter Kashem. Also speaking are Hunter students Bruce Bauman, Robert Scott Jackson, and Bryan Memorial Gallery Board member and artist Andrew Orr. Orr’s work and the work of Orr’s students are featured in a simultaneous exhibition in the Gallery’s Middle Room.

This exhibit was curated by Bryan Gallery Executive Director Mickey Myers with assistance from artist and Bryan Memorial Gallery Board member Andrew Orr. Elizabeth Ives Hunter loaned the Robert Douglas Hunter paintings in the show and provided its art historical context.

(text adapted from the venue’s press materials)

Image:
Crockery, Glass, and an Iron Kettle
by Robert Douglas Hunter
20″x28″
oil on canvas
2012