Main Street Landing

Since the early 1980’s, Melinda Moulton and Lisa Steele have pioneered environmental and socially responsible redevelopment. Their company, Main Street Landing, has been incrementally developing Burlington’s Waterfront, an endeavor that encompasses four buildings in one of the most important locales in the city, including outdoor installations, as well as artist studios. the Art’s Alive Gallery and the Wing Gallery (curated by Art’s Alive).

Union Station
Union Station at One Main Street has three floors of art. Just outside the Main Street entrance to Union Station, you can see Christopher Curtis’ sculpture Venus and, looking up, Steve Larrabee’s Winged Monkeys. The floor off the Main Street entrance is the home of Katharine Montstream’s studio, as well as the Art’s Alive Gallery. Each month, Art’s Alive presents the work of Vermont artists. The train level floor includes part of the Art’s Alive Gallery, as well as Lars-Erik Fisk’s Train Ball and a mural of Waterfront images by Nancy Barnett of Fresco Studio. On display on the third floor (use elevator to access) are ten photographs from Peter Miller’s “Vermont Farm Women” series.

Main Street Landing Union Station
1 Main Street, Burlington 05401
(802) 864-7999
WEBSITE

Art’s Alive Gallery at Main Street Landing Union Station
Train Lobby and Main Lobby
1 Main Street, Burlington 05401
(802) 864-1557
WEBSITE

Main Street Landing Union Station is open Monday-Friday, 10AM-6PM and Saturday, noon-4PM and for Burlington’s First Friday Art Walk until 8PM.

Wing Building
Don’t let the fact that the Wing Gallery is the building’s hallway put you off. Wing Gallery is an excellent example of adapted space, something artists in Vermont are remarkably good at. A long corridor curated by Art’s Alive, the space is well-lit with directional overhead lighting.

Main Street Landing Wing Building
1 Steele Street (exiting Union Station from the train level and turning left, you’ll see Kate Hodges’ locomotion mural and the entrance to the Wing Building) , Burlington 05401
(802) 864-1557
WEBSITE

The Wing Building is open Monday-Friday, 7AM-8PM.

CornerStone Building
The CornerStone Building at Three Main Street is just to the south of Union Station and offers three floors of mostly Vermont art. Enter the CornerStone Building from Main Street and look up to see Jack Chase’s 11-piece sculpture, Mobile, which depicts scenes of life along Lake Champlain. Immediately inside the double doors is a large work by Sally Linder. Wander the corridors and see work by Sean Dye, Carol MacDonald, Jennifer Koch, and Reed Prescott, among others.

Main Street Landing CornerStone Building
3 Main Street, Burlington 05401
(802) 864-7999
WEBSITE

The CornerStone Building is open Monday-Friday during regular business hours.

Lake & College Building
Each of the three floors of Lake & College has art for your enjoyment. Main Street Landing commissioned two murals by local airbrush artist Ron Hernandez. On the First Floor (turning right after you enter) is Hernandez’s 2008 Endangered Species mural. His other mural, Pan of the Seasons, Lake Champlain, is on the third floor in the Lake Lobby. A unique historical display is worth a trip to the second floor corridor at the south end of Lake & College. Richard Moulton presents 59 reproductions of photographs and artwork detailing the history of Burlington’s Waterfront, from the time of Champlain to now. Other Vermont artists whose work is on display at Lake & College include Katharine Monstream, Livy Hitchcock, Annelein Beukenkamp, Alistair McCallum, Caleb Clark and Ginny O’Reilly.

Main Street Landing Lake & College
Corner of Lake & College Streets, Burlington 05401
(802) 864-7999
WEBSITE

Main Street Landing Lake & College is open during regular business hours.

In the office of Main Street Landing at Union Station hangs a watercolor of two red shoes by E. Bunsen.  Moulton explains why Steele purchased the painting. “When we owned the Pease Grain Tower, I used to go in with my red high heels and shoot rats with water pistols to get the rats out of the way so I could check the building. The red shoes represented something to her. A lot of the art that’s in the building is something that represents something to one of us.” Take a tour of these buildings and one may find a piece of art that means something to you too.